Principal's Bio
Positioning

You want to see your company name in print, or be known as the top-of-mind expert in your field, but do you know how to get results from working with the media?

Take the quiz below to see how you would fare in specific situations. When you are finished, click on the Send button. You will receive your score — and a detailed explanation of the answers — within 48 hours.

1. You are in the middle of an interview when the reporter starts asking questions about your private business’ financials, which you do not want to share. You:
a.

Tell the individual that it is company policy to never share proprietary information.

b. Object but tell.
c.

Give a range of figures.

d.

Tell the reporter you’ll call later with the numbers.


2. The reporter interviewing you is displaying a poor knowledge of your business, but keeps asking biased, unfavorable questions. You:
a.

Conclude the interview as fast as you can.

b.

Provide the reporter with as many facts as you can.

c.

Answer each question to refute all the negatives.

d.

Give the reporter appropriate company materials as factual support.     


3. The reporter is pressing you with questions that require statistical knowledge you don’t have. You:
a.

Tell the reporter you don’t have the answers but will find someone that does.

b.

Provide the reporter with other stats.

c.

Come up with approximate numbers.

d.

Call someone into your office to answer the reporter’s questions.


4. You are in the middle of a crisis and word has leaked out. When the media starts calling, you:
a.

Tell reporters you can’t comment.

b.

Tell them you are looking into the matter, but can’t spare anyone on your team to comment.

c.

Explain the situation and keep them informed.

d.

Deny you have a problem and talk instead about your company’s strengths.


5. Layoffs are imminent in your company. You:
a.

Make the announcement to the media first and give hard numbers that justify the layoffs to both your employees and the media.

b.

Give the media hard numbers plus a Q & A to explain the layoffs at the same time you announce the layoffs to your employees.

c.

Give the media the same Q & A and hard numbers you give your employees.

d.

Make the announcement to your employees first and then to the media and provide both with a customized Q&A.


6. A reporter calls you and asks you to comment on a just-released industry survey. You:
a.

Ask the reporter to go over the key points before commenting.

b.

Tell the reporter you need to take a look at it before commenting.

c.

Tell the reporter you can’t comment because you have not seen the survey.

d.

Do not comment but talk instead about key industry issues.


7. Your main competitor is getting hammered in the press. You get a call from a reporter looking for your take on it. You:
a.

Do not comment on the situation but emphasize your own company’s achievements.

b.

Do not comment on the situation but address the real issues facing your industry.

c.

Tell the reporter you won’t comment on your competition.

d.

Tell the reporter you won’t comment but offer your sympathy for what your competitor is going through.


8. The reporter brings up rumors about new legislation that could affect your industry negatively. You:
a.

Brush off the rumors as speculative.

b.

Dismiss the premise as speculative.

c.

Confirm whether or not there is pending legislation.

d.

Talk about the issues facing your industry and your solutions to them.


9. You get a call from a reporter who is interested in your soon-to-be-released product. You:
a.

Give the reporter a highly detailed, technical description.

b.

Provide the reporter with a list of the product’s benefits for the user.

c.

Give a concise explanation of why the product is different and what it does for the user.

d.

Provide the reporter with a detailed fact sheet and make yourself available for follow-up questions.


10. You gave an interview to a publication and are appalled to see that the resulting article contains factual errors, in addition to being slightly critical of your business. You:
a.

Let the reporter know you are disappointed in the coverage.

b.

Let it pass so as not to aggravate the situation.

c.

Contact the reporter to correct the errors.

d.

Contact the editor to correct the errors.

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